Around The World – On His Path

Where We Work

India:

  •  Pastor sponsorship
  •  Vikmuthi School for children of lepers
  •  Nutrition support for widows • Microenterprise to save women from slavery
  •  Medical care and nutrition for lepers
  •  New clubfoot clinics

Liberia:

  • Aid to Ebola victims

Guatemala:

  • Homes for the homeless
  • Medical support
  • Food distribution
  • Wheelchair repair and distribution
  • Education and tutoring
  • Human trafficking shelter

El Salvador:

  • Clubfoot clinics and counseling for families
  • Healing hundreds of children each year
  • Bringing hope to families through the Word

Uganda:

God’s Mercy Primary School and Orphan’s Care Centre

  • Exceptional education programs
  • Nutrition support
  • Medical care and clean water
  • Microenterprise to bring the desperate out of poverty

Haiti:

  • Ministry through education
  • Street children saved from lives of crime and taught the Gospel
  • AIDS relief and care

Zambia:

  • Feeding program serving 290 orphans/day

Sierra Leone:

  • Ruth Vines Memorial School
  • Care and support for orphans
  • Clubfoot brace makers
  • Care and education for disabled children

Mexico:

  • Sponsorship of clubfoot clinic coordinators
  • Sponsorship of clubfoot braces

Sharing God’s Love through Education

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Sharing God’s Love through Education

In a small, impoverished Haitian village on the shores of Lake Azuei, receiving an education used to be considered a luxury.

In Haiti (as in many developing countries), you have to pay to send your children to school, and for this community, the nearest school was very far away. Though these parents work very hard to provide for their families, most barely make enough to feed their children. Therefore, many adults in this village have never attended school and until 2013, most of the children had never had the chance to go to school.

To help break through the cycle of poverty by way of education, Operation Blessing built a school in this village called Ecole Nouvelle Lac Azuei (ENLA) School. On His Path began supporting ENLA in 2014, to help fund operating expenses so that these impoverished children can thrive. Today the ENLA School consists of two separate kindergarten and primary school buildings, a kitchen, water cistern, latrines and a food depot. It serves more than 300 children with a traditional Western education, Bible classes, summer camps and bi-annual health screenings. Students receive two nutritious meals each day at the school, with special attention given to children suffering from malnourishment.

Adult literacy classes are also provided for the adults in the village, including lessons from reading the Bible. One adult student, Suzette, is grateful to the ENLA School on behalf of her four children and herself. Suzette and her husband don’t have regular jobs; they make their living by fishing. Before her children attended ENLA, experiences such as learning, eating well and having regular health checkups were non-existent. Now, Suzette and her children benefit from the school’s programs.

Suzette cherishes her newly acquired knowledge. Through the adult literacy program, Suzette has learned how to write her and her children’s names, and she is growing more and more confident in reading. “I couldn’t write,” she said. “I was very happy when they taught me the letters of the alphabet because even though I can repeat a lot of words, I never knew how to write them.”

The education and nutrition opportunities provided to students at ENLA removes barriers to growth often experienced by families in impoverished communities. The hope given to Suzette and 600 others in the village is a step toward breaking generational poverty, helping families improve their lives and have bigger dreams for their futures.

Submitted by Ronda Sherman, Operation Blessing

Haiti for Christ

Aroundtw“Wow, what a generous gift! Thank you
very much.” As I said this, I wondered why the Haitian man who had once stolen from us offerered such a sacricial gift. I lifted potatoes, turnips, spinach and watercress from the piled high basket and admired each o ering; it was a beautiful and expensive gift for a poor truck driver with a family. “

Charles nodded and grinned, “When a man is healed he must go back and say, ‘Thank you for what you did for me. Thank you for healing me.’”

Immediately I knew Charles was referring to the ten lepers in Luke chapter 17. Jesus heals the ten lepers but only one comes back to thank Him.

One of them, when he saw he was healed, came back, praising God in a loud voice. He threw himself at Jesus’ feet and thanked him—and he was a Samaritan.

Jesus asked, “Were not all ten cleansed? Where are the other nine? Has no one returned to give praise to God except this foreigner?” Then he said to him, “Rise and go; your faith has made you well.” Luke 17:15-19

Charles lives in a two room concrete house with a tin roof on the Kenscoff Mountain. His brothers and mom have similar homes nearby. On Thursdays, peasant merchant women with heavy hand woven baskets balanced on their heads walk for miles to the market near Charles’ home. With the help of another merchant, the women lower their baskets to the ground and arrange lettuce, tomatoes, potatoes and other produce on a burlap sack or piece of carton spread on the packed earth and then they squat in a deep knee bend behind their wares as they wait for customers.

Charles drives a Mack truck up and down the mountain delivering sand and gravel for concrete construction projects. His salary provides for his children’s education and daily needs; the family is healthy and well fed. For ve years before his job as a truck driver, Charles drove a pickup for our mission Haiti for Christ. His happy go lucky, jovial face was always a welcome sight at the mission of ce; unfortunately his exuberance was a mask hiding a dis guring and deadly leprosy. (Leprosy is often a symbol of pervasive, addictive sin in the bible.)

One day my husband Joel left the mission checkbook on the pickup dash while he went into the of ce; Charles was in the driver’s seat. Hours later Joel discovered an entire page of checks missing from the checkbook! (Employee theft is rampant in Haiti.) We knew

our only option was to dismiss Charles immediately and pay his severance with no accusation or charges. Haitian law is Napoleonic Code thus to accuse someone without absolute proof, the checks in his hand, would jeopardize our mission. Since we did not have that eyewitness proof we knew the process was to send him home without explanation and stop the missing checks.

When Joel red Charles later that day, the driver did not object
or question the action; he knew why even though it was never mentioned. We did not see Charles for years after that but we often thought of his smiling face and warm greeting. Our forty years in Haiti have taught us to be wary of thievery but our hearts are always pained for the sin that enslaves Haitians.

Charles knows the gospel; he knows what we stand for as does all of Haiti. We host and produce Haiti’s favorite television show, a Creole Christian travelogue shot on location; it is our powerful pulpit to the nation. We lm a different Haitian village in each episode and show the beauty of the country and her people and then Joel ministers

a word from the Lord often about repentance from leprous sin. To date we have produced eighty-six shows and La Bonne Nouvelle, The Good News, is aired on eighty stations throughout Haiti, the Caribbean and Haitian markets in Montreal, Boston, New York

and South Florida. Our estimated viewing audience is two million Haitians every day!

Last month as we sat down to dinner, the doorbell rang; after years of not seeing him, Charles was at the gate. Joel went out to speak with him. Charles greeted him and said, “I have been watching your television show every day and it has changed me.”

Joel came to get me. “Yvonne, come and see this!” I went to witness the wonder my husband was so excited about.

Charles sat on the low wall beside our driveway, next to him
was a basket over owing with produce; he greeted me with his customary wide smile and strong hug. “Charles,” I said, “Look how fat you are!” (In Haiti, weight gain is a sign of prosperity and to notice it is a compliment.)

Charles beamed and pointed at the basket, “This is for you and Pastor Joel!”

I asked about his wife and children. “Everyone is ne; God is blessing us,” he happily assured me. Charles helped us carry the heavy basket into the house and then he again shook our hands.
“I am healed because of what you did for me.” He said, “Thank you.”

As we returned to our dinner table, Joel asked, “Can you believe what just happened? God healed him of his sin and he came back to thank us for it.”

I agreed. “It makes it all worth it. If he was the only one that got right with God, he just made it all worth it. Forty years of praying and preaching I would do it all for one soul, glory to God.” But to myself, I thought, “Were not all ten cleansed? Where are the other nine?”

Yes, Christ is using us; yes, souls are being saved every day but until we get to heaven and see Jesus face to face, we cannot imagine the transforming power of the gospel – The Good News – that we practice and preach every day. We cannot imagine the convicting impact of our soul winning television show watched by young, old, rich, poor, voodooist, drug dealers and even politicians, but on that day we will see them in Heaven!

Our driver Charles was a thief, but now he is a blood- washed saint with his name written in the Lamb’s book of life. He is brand new, born again; old things are passed away and all things are new. I have often told friends, “When you get to heaven, I will be sitting in the Haitian section!” Now we are assured that happy go lucky, once leprous Charles will be there too!

Submitted by: Yvonne Trimble of Haiti for Christ

Haiti for Christ

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“Wow, what a generous gift! Thank you very much.” As I said this, I wondered why the Haitian man who had once stolen from us offered such a sacrificial gift. I lifted potatoes, turnips, spinach and watercress from the piled high basket and admired each offering; it was a beautiful and expensive gift for a poor truck driver with a family.

Charles nodded and grinned, “When a man is healed he must go back and say, ‘Thank you for what you did for me. Thank you for healing me.’” Immediately I knew Charles was referring to the ten lepers in Luke chapter 17. Jesus heals the ten lepers but only one comes back to thank Him. One of them, when he saw he was healed, came back, praising God in a loud voice. He threw himself at Jesus’ feet and thanked him—and he was a Samaritan. Jesus asked, “Were not all ten cleansed? Where are the other nine? Has no one returned to give praise to God except this foreigner?” Then he said to him, “Rise and go; your faith has made you well.” Luke 17:15-19 Charles lives in a two room concrete house with a tin roof on the Kenscoff Mountain. His brothers and mom have similar homes nearby. On Thursdays, peasant merchant women with heavy hand woven baskets balanced on their heads walk for miles to the market near Charles’ home. With the help of another merchant, the women lower their baskets to the ground and arrange lettuce, tomatoes, potatoes and other produce on a burlap sack or piece of carton spread on the packed earth and then they squat in a deep knee bend behind their wares as they wait for customers. Charles drives a Mack truck up and down the mountain delivering sand and gravel for concrete construction projects. His salary provides for his children’s education and daily needs; the family is healthy and well fed. For five years before his job as a truck driver,  Charles drove a pickup for our mission Haiti for Christ. His happy go lucky, jovial face was always a welcome sight at the mission office; unfortunately his exuberance was a mask hiding a disfiguring and deadly leprosy. (Leprosy is often a symbol of pervasive, addictive sin in the bible.) One day my husband Joel left the mission checkbook on the pickup dash while he went into the office; Charles was in the driver’s seat. Hours later Joel discovered an entire page of checks missing from the checkbook! (Employee theft is rampant in Haiti.) We knew our only option was to dismiss Charles immediately and pay his severance with no accusation or charges. Haitian law is Napoleonic Code thus to accuse someone without absolute proof, the checks in his hand, would jeopardize our mission. Since we did not have that eyewitness proof we knew the process was to send him home without explanation and stop the missing checks. When Joel fired Charles later that day, the driver did not object or question the action; he knew why even though it was never mentioned. We did not see Charles for years after that but we often thought of his smiling face and warm greeting. Our forty years in Haiti have taught us to be wary of thievery but our hearts are always pained for the sin that enslaves Haitians. Charles knows the gospel; he knows what we stand for as does all of Haiti. We host and produce Haiti’s favorite television show, a Creole Christian travelogue shot on location; it is our powerful pulpit to the nation. We film a different Haitian village in each episode and show the beauty of the country and her people and then Joel ministers a word from the Lord often about repentance from leprous sin. To date we have produced eighty-six shows and La Bonne Nouvelle, The Good News, is aired on eighty stations throughout Haiti, the Caribbean and Haitian markets in Montreal, Boston, New York and South Florida. Our estimated viewing audience is two million Haitians every day! Last month as we sat down to dinner, the doorbell rang; after years of not seeing him, Charles was at the gate. Joel went out to speak with him. Charles greeted him and said, “I have been watching your television show every day and it has changed me.”  Joel came to get me. “Yvonne, come and see this!” I went to witness the wonder my husband was so excited about. Charles sat on the low wall beside our driveway, next to him was a basket overflowing with produce; he greeted me with his customary wide smile and strong hug. “Charles,” I said, “Look how fat you are!” (In Haiti, weight gain is a sign of prosperity and to notice it is a compliment.) Charles beamed and pointed at the basket, “This is for you and Pastor Joel!” I asked about his wife and children. “Everyone is fine; God is blessing us,” he happily assured me. Charles helped us carry the  heavy basket into the house and then he again shook our hands. “I am healed because of what you did for me.” He said, “Thank you.” As we returned to our dinner table, Joel asked, “Can you believe what just happened? God healed him of his sin and he came back to thank us for it.” I agreed. “It makes it all worth it. If he was the only one that got right with God, he just made it all worth it. Forty years of praying and preaching I would do it all for one soul, glory to God.” But to myself, I thought, “Were not all ten cleansed? Where are the other nine?” Yes, Christ is using us; yes, souls are being saved every day but until we get to heaven and see Jesus face to face, we cannot imagine the transforming power of the gospel – The Good News – that we practice and preach every day. We cannot imagine the convicting impact of our soul winning television show watched by young, old, rich, poor, voodooist, drug dealers and even politicians, but on that day we will see them in Heaven! Our driver Charles was a thief, but now he is a blood washed saint with his name written in the Lamb’s book of life. He is brand new, born again; old things are passed away and all things are new. I have often told friends, “When you get to heaven, I will be sitting in the Haitian section!” Now we are assured that happy go lucky, once leprous Charles will be there too!

Submitted by Yvonne Trimble of Haiti for Christ

Haiti Comfort

About Us – We’ve been here for 10 years and have 15 children and an infant coming. We take nothing but AIDS children. We took care of a lot of initial needs by selling our house many moons ago. We bought 10 year old vehicles which are now 20! Our dump truck which is torn apart right now is just too dangerous to transport kids in. Our van lived a very short life after six 5-year-olds put everything fathomable in the gas tank! Sad, but cute! They are all 9 & 10 now….Praise God! This ministry is certainly one big happy family but we need to raise serious money to accommodate our growth. We contribute our total reserve military pensions to what we do. After running operations, it’s gone.

A Blessing Arrives from On His Path. There’s a foundation that has stepped up for us in a big way twice before and noticed our transportation woes and invited us to apply for monies for a truck and yes, we were approved! What a gift from God! We picked up our new truck and it is a joyful time and a very thankful time. Why thank God? ….because He sees that we are provided for and protected. We, as Christians, give our glory to Him first and always. Many Christians, who act as God’s emissaries choose not to be exposed and therefore, we, for the most part let God be God and He will bless their lives. WE are not capable of doing these things.

Submitted by Trisha Comfort, Haiti Comfort

Haiti Update

As both the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere and the second most densely populated, Haiti is especially vulnerable to natural disasters, climate shocks and disease. Access to sufficient quantities of nutritious food remains an issue for millions of Haitians. An estimated 38 percent of the population is hungry. Most children are raised on a skimpy diet of rice and beans. Lack of protein causes a variety of health and learning problems and is a major factor in perpetuating poverty. Three years ago, John Mitchell visited Operation Blessing’s Zanmi Beni Children’s Home in Haiti, and was touched by the need of this nation. On His Path invested in Operation Blessing’s Fish Farm and Hatchery at Zanmi Beni, an innovative project designed to provide sustainable ways to increase food availability for the population and help strengthen the economy. Haitians love but cannot afford fish. Inland lakes are fished out and accessible inshore ocean waters have been ravished by generations of desperate fishermen. At first, the vision for the fish farm was to provide fresh fish for the children in the Zanmi Beni orphanage, and if successful, expand and build a hatchery to teach aspiring Haitians about fish farming. God granted favor, sent experts to help and multiplied the resources. Completed in 2011, Operation Blessing’s Fish Farm & Hatchery at Zanmi Beni children’s home produced 52,000 pounds of proteinrich tilapia for consumption and resale in 2012. This modern-day “loaves and fishes” effort not only helped feed children at Zanmi Beni, but also nearby orphanages, schools and hospitals. The remainder was sold to support the orphanage and fish farm. The fish farm also provided technical advice and designed fish farms for local Haitians, so there are many small fish farms starting up around Haiti, including one on the campus of St. Damian’s/St. Luke’s Hospitals. Most importantly, Operation Blessing began “seeding” the lake and reservoirs of Haiti with tilapia. Operation Blessing’s Fish Farm and Hatchery is capable of producing 500,000 fingerlings (baby fish) that can then be seeded in ponds and reservoirs to help replenish the fish stock and be “ranched.” Unlike the fish farming done at the hatchery, where fish are raised in tight quarters and fed high-protein food so they can grow as fast as possible, this program works in open ponds, lakes and reservoirs. This is a small but mighty solution with powerful returns. All you need are baby fish that cost ten cents each, a body of water and sunshine – God provides the rest. Massive numbers of baby tilapia are released into Haiti’s lakes and reservoirs to forage on their own. Tilapia are herbivores and thrive grazing on algae the same way that cattle or horses graze on grass. Baby fish that cost a dime can grow into fish worth $5 or more in less than a year. OBI is pioneering fish ranching in Haiti, working with the Haitian Department of Agriculture as well as a faith-based local charity that builds lakes and reservoirs. With these partnerships, the fish farm has put over 1,000,000 fingerlings and fish fry into the lake to help jumpstart the fishing industry. The goal is to populate these and barren public waters all over Haiti with tilapia. As they grow and mature, fishermen will catch many to feed their families and to sell for income, but many will survive, breed and multiply, expanding the population for years to come. A small but mighty way to fight poverty in a nation that desperately needs your help.

Submitted by Ronda Sherman, OBI Executive Director of Philanthropy